Richard Wright


Richard Wright (b. 1960 in London, living and working in Glasgow) studied at the Edinburgh College of Art and the Glasgow School of Art. He taught as a professor of painting at the California Institute of the Arts, Los Angeles and the Glasgow School of Art. Wright was awarded the 2009 Turner Prize, and is known for his ornamental drawing interventions into existing exhibition architectures. Elaborately produced, his work responds to the space, into which it is inscribed as an autonomous statement of form. Wright opposes the established reality of the white cube with the means of ornamentation, creating a poetic space between his work and the viewers. His works are represented in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Tate Gallery, London and the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. He has won other awards, including the Award for Visual Arts, Paul Hamlyn Foundation (1998), and the Major Award, Scottish Arts Council (1997). Exhibitions include Theseustempel, Vienna (2013); MARTa Herford (2012); Neuer Berliner Kunstverein; Gagosian Gallery, Beverly Hills, USA (2011); Museum of Modern Art, London (2009); The Modern Institute, Glasgow (2003); Museum Van Loon, Amsterdam (2000); Manifesta 2, Luxembourg (1998). For Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, Wright created a single-colored screen print, the lettering drawn with the computer revealing in white the words Moon and Tree. The subtle arrangement of the letters on the picture plane evokes a tree and the moon in the space of one’s imagination.



Moon and Tree
2013,
1.100 euro member, 1.300 euro non-member